Rencong Meuccange

IN26 Recong, rentcong
Sumatra Atjeh-Aceh with Rentjong 1899

Code IN26

See Rencong.

This is a small contemporary rencong (rentcong, rentjong, rintjong rentjoeng, reuncong) from the Aceh region in Northern Sumatra.  The rencong is still worn during traditional ceremonies. The hilt style of this weapon is "hulu meuccange".  This type of hilt has a thicker part in the middle called a "Boh mano", or chicken egg. This hilt and scabbard are made from horn that is translucent - you can see the blade inside the scabbard when a light shines through it.  The bands on the sheath are silver and the blade is of high nickel steel. 

The rencong is carried on the left hand side, inserted between the body and girdle.  As with krisses, people attribute mystical powers to rencongs.

"The Rencong is a dagger as important to the Acehnese as the Keris is to the Javanese. According to some scholars, its shape is said to symbolize the Arab lettering of the invocation “Bismillaah”. One can accept this interpretation or not, however the Islamic symbolism is evident in the Rencong shape and decoration. As the Keris, it is believed to have a mystic power.


The Rencong is worn slipped into the folds of the sarong on the left hand side of the stomach directed to the right hand. It is part of the traditional Acehnese clothing and is still worn for ceremonies and weddings."


- Old Blades

Rentcong and Scabbard

Rentcong and Scabbard

From Draeger, D.F (1972) P. 151:

"Aceh's history is filled with a large array of weaponry. Swords and daggers have been used throughout for both ceremonial purposes and war, Aceh having experienced both in abundance. The rencong is one of those weapons which has been elevated to the position of a symbol for the whole province."


Rencong Blade Detail

Rencong Blade Detail

Rencong Spine

Rencong Spine

"The rencong was a particularly effective weapon; instructions for its use are as follows: The rencong is usually worn sheathed on the left hand side of the bearer. When it is used as a weapon, then it is usually drawn with the left foot forward so that by a quick short step forward with the right foot, the thrust of the knife receives added impetus. The blade is withdrawn from its sheath, cutting edge toward the enemy. It is then whipped to the right by a snap of the hand which brings the palm upward; the elbow is held fairly close to the body. The thrust is made by extending the right arm almost to full extension and turning the palm downward just prior to penetration of the target"

How to hold a rentcong

How to hold a rentcong

Edged Weapons of the Indonesian Archipelago

Rencong by Barbara Leigh